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Thread: Ohhhh, so, there was a Quid Pro Quo...uh, er, uh, no, that's not what I meant to say, there WASN'T, lol

  1. #1 Ohhhh, so, there was a Quid Pro Quo...uh, er, uh, no, that's not what I meant to say, there WASN'T, lol 
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    This is hilarious, bring in the clowns.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/natio...67e_story.html
    After saying Trump held back aid to pressure Ukraine, Mulvaney tries to walk back comments

    Mick Mulvaney’s bombshell briefing on Ukraine, in 2 minutes





    Here are key moments from acting White House chief of staff Mick Mulvaney's remarks to reporters about Ukraine on Oct. 17. (Zach Purser Brown/The Washington Post)


    By Karoun Demirjian and

    John Hudson




    Oct. 17, 2019 at 5:03 p.m. PDT

    Acting White House chief of staff Mick Mulvaney said at a news conference Thursday that President Trump withheld nearly $400 million in military aid in part to pressure Ukraine to pursue an investigation that could benefit him politically — acknowledging before the nation a quid pro quo that is at the heart of an impeachment inquiry and that the president and his allies have vigorously denied for weeks.


    Mulvaney told reporters that Trump wanted the government in Kyiv to investigate a debunked conspiracy theory that a hacked Democratic National Committee computer server was taken to Ukraine in 2016 to hide evidence that it was that country, not Russia, that interfered in the presidential election.

    “Did [Trump] also mention to me in the past the corruption related to the DNC server?” he said. “Absolutely, no question about that. But that’s it, and that’s why we held up the money.”
    Mulvaney denied that the aid was also contingent on a Ukrainian investigation of former vice president Joe Biden, or Biden’s son Hunter, another potential quid pro quo that congressional Democrats are looking into as part of the impeachment inquiry.


    Gordon Sondland, U.S. ambassador to the European Union, arrives for closed-door testimony before House committees on Capitol Hill on Thursday. (Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP)
    Mulvaney defended the president’s actions as commonplace and appropriate. “I have news for everybody: Get over it. There’s going to be political influence in foreign policy,” Mulvaney said.

    Mulvaney emerges as a key facilitator of the campaign to pressure Ukraine

    Later, after Trump’s lawyer and other Republicans distanced themselves from Mulvaney, the White House scrambled to walk back his comments, issuing an official statement blaming the media for misconstruing his words “to advance a biased and political witch hunt against President Trump.”

    “Let me be clear,” Mulvaney’s written statement said, “there was absolutely no quid pro quo between Ukrainian military aid and any investigation into the 2016 election. There was never any connection between the funds and the Ukrainians doing anything with the server . . . there was never any condition on the flow of the aid related to the matter of the DNC server.”


    Mulvaney’s comments at the news conference — and his attempt to back out of them — added to a growing swirl of crisis around Trump, brought on not only by the specter of impeachment but also his erratic decision-making regarding the country’s military presence in Syria and the announcement Thursday, also by Mulvaney, that next year’s G-7 summit of world leaders will be held at Trump’s Miami resort. That decision, which could enrich the president while raising the profile of one of his struggling properties, has been widely criticized as an unprecedented conflict of interest.

    On Capitol Hill, where Democrats are building their case against the president, impeachment investigators spent nine hours Thursday deposing U.S. Ambassador to the European Union Gordon Sondland, the latest in a succession of officials to appear for closed-door testimony about the administration’s dealings with Ukraine.

    Sondland told them that the president had outsourced U.S. policy on Ukraine to Trump’s personal attorney Rudolph W. Giuliani — a decision he said he disagreed with but carried out nonetheless. Giuliani had been pushing the Ukrainians to investigate interference in the 2016 election.

    In a sign of how potentially damaging Mulvaney’s remarks were, Jay Sekulow, another of Trump’s personal attorneys, released a statement that said: “The President’s legal counsel was not involved in acting chief of staff Mick Mulvaney’s press briefing.” Within the hour, Mulvaney issued his statement attempting to walk back what he’d said earlier.

    Even before Sekulow issued his statement, a Justice Department official took issue with Mulvaney’s original remarks: “If the White House was withholding aid in regards to the cooperation of any investigation at the Department of Justice, that is news to us.”

    Mulvaney’s comments alarmed and incensed some Republicans, who have supported Trump but were unaware whether the White House was intentionally shifting its defense strategy.

    “Totally inexplicable,” said one GOP lawmaker, speaking on the condition of anonymity to be candid. “He literally said the thing the president and everyone else said did not happen.”

    To the Democrats on the three panels conducting the impeachment probe, Mulvaney’s words marked a significant turning point.
    “We have a confession from the president,” said Rep. Eric Swalwell (D-Calif.), a member of the House Intelligence Committee, referring to Trump’s July 25 phone call with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky, during which Trump pressured his counterpart to open investigations into the 2016 election and the Bidens.



    Mulvaney, Swalwell said, “co-signed the president’s confession,” adding that the administration was still engaging in “an ongoing coverup.”

    During his news conference, Mulvaney denied such assertions, saying the administration had not attempted to hide anything by moving a transcript of Trump’s phone call with Zelensky to a more secure server at the White House.


    “Let me ask you this: If we wanted to cover this up, would we have called the Department of Justice almost immediately and have them look at the transcript of the tape, which we did, by the way?” Mulvaney said. “If we wanted to cover this up, would we have released it to the public?”

    As Mulvaney jousted with reporters at the White House, members of the House Intelligence, Oversight and Foreign Affairs committees — which are conducting the impeachment probe — questioned Sondland, who said he was uncomfortable with the decision to cede responsibility for Ukraine policy to Giuliani. “I would not have recommended that Mr. Giuliani or any private citizen be involved in these foreign policy matters,” Sondland said, according to his prepared remarks.

    Mulvaney dismissed those concerns, defending the president’s right to put foreign policy in the hands of his personal lawyer.


    “You may not like the fact that Giuliani was involved. That’s great; that’s fine,” Mulvaney said, referencing Sondland’s remarks. “It’s not illegal. It’s not impeachable . . . The president gets to set foreign policy, and he gets to choose who to do so, as long as it doesn’t violate any law.”

    ‘Disruptive diplomat’ Gordon Sondland, a key figure in Trump impeachment furor, long coveted ambassadorship

    Sondland, a major Trump donor who has become a focus of the impeachment inquiry because of his outsize role in U.S.-Ukraine policy, criticized the president’s temporary hold on aid and the recall of the former U.S. ambassador to Ukraine, Marie Yovanovitch. Sondland called her an “excellent diplomat” and said he “regretted” her departure, which followed a campaign by Giuliani to paint her as disloyal to the president.

    Democratic lawmakers emerging from Sondland’s deposition said that although they found him to be generally credible and were glad that he chose to testify despite White House pressure not to, they thought Sondland was being selective and cagey with details.


    “I think he’s clearly trying to defend his reputation and his own behavior,” said Rep. David N. Cicilline (D-R.I.), a member of the Foreign Affairs Committee. He also criticized some of Sondland’s testimony as “not credible to me, with respect to his sort of not understanding all the things that were happening around him, and in full view of the American people.”

    In his prepared remarks, Sondland, a hotel magnate who came to the job with no diplomatic experience, depicts himself as a well-meaning but in some cases out-of-the-loop emissary for the president who tried to do what he could to prop up the government of Ukraine as it fends off Russian-backed separatists.

    “I did not understand, until much later, that Mr. Giuliani’s agenda might have also included an effort to prompt the Ukrainians to investigate Vice President Biden or his son or to involve Ukrainians, directly or indirectly, in the President’s 2020 reelection campaign,” he said, explaining that he understood that Burisma, the Ukrainian energy firm that employed Hunter Biden, was “one of many examples of Ukrainian companies run by oligarchs and lacking the type of corporate governance structures found in Western companies.”


    Sondland’s apparent failure to connect the dots between Burisma and the Bidens occurred as Giuliani made several televised appearances over the spring and summer criticizing Hunter Biden’s involvement on the board, and numerous newspaper and magazine articles questioned whether his role at Burisma could prove to be a drag on his father’s presidential campaign.

    “Withholding foreign aid to pressure a foreign government to take such steps would be wrong,” he stated in his prepared testimony. “I did not and would not ever participate in such undertakings.”

    Fiona Hill, Trump’s ex-Russia adviser told impeachment investigators of Giuliani’s efforts in Ukraine

    But that testimony appears to conflict with what other current and former Trump administration officials told House investigators over the past two weeks.

    Fiona Hill, the National Security Council’s former senior director for Russia and Europe, told House investigators that she was concerned by Sondland’s talk of investigations in a July meeting, which she eventually relayed to a lawyer for the National Security Council.

    Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Europe and Eurasia George Kent testified that Sondland was deputized, along with former special U.S. envoy to Ukraine Kurt Volker and Energy Secretary Rick Perry, to be one of “three amigos” running Ukraine policy. The move came during a May meeting that Mulvaney organized following Yovanovitch’s ouster.

    Last week, Volker provided impeachment investigators with text messages showing that Sondland had said Trump, before agreeing to meet in person with his Ukrainian counterpart, wanted the “deliverable” of a promise from Zelensky to investigate Burisma and the 2016 election.

    Sondland claimed that his pursuit of investigations in Ukraine were always in line with long-standing U.S. policy to push for transparency and anti-corruption efforts in the country. He added that he was never aware of objections to the plans for Ukraine policy from Hill or her boss, then-national security adviser John Bolton. Hill testified Monday that Bolton was livid that Giuliani was directing a shadow Ukraine policy.

    “I have to view her testimony — if the media reports are accurate — as the product of hindsight and in the context of the widely known tensions between the NSC, on the one hand, and the State Department, on the other hand,” Sondland said.

    Josh Dawsey, Matt Zapotosky and Carol D. Leonnig contributed to this report.


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  2. #2  
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    Crickets on THIS story, too, huh? You Righties are gutless scum, no doubt about it. Maybe Mick should've remembered his comments about Twittler from years ago: "
    a 'terrible human being'

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MeCx12lT1zg&t=77s

    Now, WHY in the world would he say such a thing, lol?
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    Mick Mulvaney Melts Down Under Brutal Grilling By Fox’s Chris Wallace

    Mulvaney continued to insist that he had been misinterpreted and that aid was only contingent on corruption and additional European assistance, causing the Fox News anchor to fire back.
    “I hate to go through this but you said what you said,” Wallace stated. “And the fact is, after that exchange with [ABC News correspondent] Jonathan Karl, you were asked another time why the aid was held up. What was the condition for the aid? And you didn’t mention two conditions, you mentioned three conditions.”
    [COLOR=#000000][FONT=Verdana]Wallace, once again, threw Mulvaney’s own remarks back in his face, playing yet another clip from the press briefing of Mulvaney claiming military aid to Ukraine was contingent upon them cooperating with the Trump administration and investigating the Democrats.
    The Trump aide, however, attempted to brush off his previous remarks by saying he didn’t actually use the words “quid pro quo,” prompting Wallace to point out that when Karl pressed him on whether or not there was a quid pro quo, Mulvaney said that “happens all the time.”
    Fox News Host Ed Henry: Not ‘Media’s Fault’ Mick Mulvaney Admitted Quid Pro Quo
    The two would go back and forth over this issue for a few more minutes, with Wallace repeatedly cornering Mulvaney over his previous comments and the chief of staff flailing away and struggling to present even a laughable defense.
    At one point, Wallace asked Mulvaney whether he had offered his resignation to Trump in the wake of the blowback and criticism he received over the press briefing. Mulvaney said the topic was “absolutely not” discussed with the president, adding that he is “very happy working there.”
    CNN, meanwhile,
    reported Sunday
    that prior to the impeachment crisis that Trump finds himself currently embroiled in, there were internal efforts to push Mulvaney out as acting chief of staff. Those efforts subsided, however, when the push for impeachment heated up in the wake of the Ukraine scandal late last month.
    Besides the issues surrounding the Ukraine scandal and impeachment,
    Wallace also grilled Mulvaney
    on the president’s sudden reversal on next year’s G7 summit, which Mulvaney
    announced last week
    would be held at Trump’s personal property.
    Asked by Wallace why the president “caved” to the bipartisan backlash, Mulvaney said Trump was “honestly surprised at the level of pushback,” adding that the president “still considers himself to be in the hospitality business.”
    Wallace seized on the “hospitality business” comment and pressed Mulvaney if the president understood why it “looked lousy.” The acting chief of staff's retort: “I think he thinks people think it looks lousy.

    Ya don't say?
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    Free Heber! Heber Carl Jentzsch, 83, President of the Church of Scientology International, is believed to be held in a Scientology prison (RPF). He has not been seen since 2005.
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    'Nobody Pushed Me.' Ukrainian President Denies Trump Pressured Him to Investigate Biden's Son


    Taking questions in Ukrainian and English on Wednesday, Zelensky said that he doesn’t have the authority to pressure Ukrainian law enforcement, and did not attempt to do so.
    “We have an independent country and independent general security. I can’t push anyone,” Zelensky said.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Acebb View Post
    'Nobody Pushed Me.' Ukrainian President Denies Trump Pressured Him to Investigate Biden's Son


    Taking questions in Ukrainian and English on Wednesday, Zelensky said that he doesn’t have the authority to pressure Ukrainian law enforcement, and did not attempt to do so.
    “We have an independent country and independent general security. I can’t push anyone,” Zelensky said.
    What do you EXPECT the guy being extorted to say when the shakedown artist is present, ya dumb bastard? GEEZ, you're dumb. Meanwhile, Dump is shopping for, yet again, a Chief of Staff, lol.

    Trump floats Mulvaney replacements including Mnuchin and Conway

    Saleha Mohsin and Jennifer Jacobs, Bloomberg Published 2:11 p.m. ET Oct. 22, 2019 | Updated 2:17 p.m. ET Oct. 22, 2019
    CONNECTTWEETLINKEDINCOMMENTEMAILMORE

    Donald Trump has for weeks been privately testing the idea of replacing his chief of staff, Mick Mulvaney, who’s swiftly fallen out of favor with some of the president’s allies after high-profile stumbles handling the House impeachment inquiry.
    About a month ago, Trump said to Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin in front of a roomful of staff: You have such great ideas, why don’t you be my chief? He has made similar remarks about Chris Liddell, a deputy chief of staff at the White House, according to people familiar with the matter. He’s also asked advisers whether his counselor Kellyanne Conway would be a good chief of staff, other people said.
    White House Chief of Staff Mick Mulvaney listers as President Donald Trump speaks during a Cabinet meeting in the Cabinet Room of the White House, Monday, Oct. 21, 2019, in Washington. Trump has for weeks been privately testing the idea of replacing Mulvaney. (Photo: Pablo Martinez Monsivais, AP)

    Some White House aides say this is nothing new, and that Trump often tests similar ideas in conversation or makes such remarks to flatter his aides and keep others on their toes.
    Mnuchin is not under formal consideration for chief of staff, one person familiar with the matter said. He is one of Trump’s most loyal aides, but his removal from the Treasury Department could disturb markets, where investors have come to regard him as a source of stability in an otherwise volatile political environment.
    Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin testifies before the House Financial Services Committee hearing Tuesday, Oct. 22, 2019. About a month ago, Trump said to Mnuchin in front of a roomful of staff: You have such great ideas, why don’t you be my chief? (Photo: Susan Walsh, AP)

    But Trump’s musings about replacing Mulvaney are a sign of the president’s growing discontent with his performance. For almost a year, Mulvaney has served as “acting” chief of staff because Trump has withheld the permanent title from him.
    Mulvaney’s standing with his boss has become unsteady after the White House’s flat-footed response to the impeachment inquiry, which some Trump allies have blamed on the chief of staff. Mulvaney further damaged himself with a news conference last week in which he admitted that aid to Ukraine was held up to pressure the country to investigate the president’s political rivals – the question at the heart of the impeachment debate.
    Previous staff shake-ups have begun with Trump asking aides and associates whether this person or that should be replaced. Former Attorney General Jeff Sessions, for instance, endured extended public speculation about his departure, fueled by Trump himself. Mulvaney is the president’s third chief of staff, appointed by tweet in December to replace John Kelly, who himself was appointed by tweet to replace Reince Priebus.
    Counselor to the President Kellyanne Conway walks past members of the media in this file photo from Thursday, Oct. 3, 2019. Trump has asked advisers whether Conway would be a good chief of staff, according to people familiar with the matter. (Photo: Pablo Martinez Monsivais, AP, File)

    Trump didn’t respond on Monday when he was asked during a Cabinet meeting whether Mulvaney would remain in his job. One aide said that the president’s silence was a signal that Trump is considering a change.
    Applause for Mulvaney
    Mulvaney’s departure isn’t seen as imminent. But some of Trump’s closest associates have assembled a roster of possible replacements if the president decides to replace Mulvaney, Bloomberg News reported Sunday. Among those said to be on the list are former acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker, former New Jersey Governor Chris Christie, and veteran political operative Wayne Berman, now a senior managing director for government relations at the Blackstone Group Inc.
    Some senior White House staff have rallied around Mulvaney. On Monday, Mulvaney admitted during a senior staff meeting that he had erred somewhat in the news conference, according to two people familiar with the matter. Other officials responded with support and a round of applause.
    “Mick Mulvaney’s standing in the White House has not changed,” White House spokesman Judd Deere said Monday in an e-mail. “He is still the acting chief of staff and has the president’s confidence.”
    Mulvaney has a number of influential allies in and close to the White House, two people said, including Russ Vought, acting director of the Office of Management and Budget; Joe Grogan of the White House’s Domestic Policy Council; and Patrick Pizzella, Deputy Secretary of Labor.
    And as Trump tries to retain his political support among Senate Republicans, who are expected to have to vote on his impeachment, some allies have raised concerns about his chief of staff.
    Rough Patch
    Senator Chuck Grassley told Politico that Mulvaney appeared at the news conference to be “somebody that didn’t know what they were talking about.”
    Christie was a top contender for the White House’s top job after Kelly was ousted late last year. But the former New Jersey governor withdrew from consideration in part over concerns that a book he planned to publish would create headaches for the White House. The memoir said that Jared Kushner, the president’s son-in-law and one of his top advisers, forced Christie from his job leading Trump’s transition team over a long-held resentment for Christie’s prosecution of Kushner’s father, Charles, in 2005.
    Kushner would also likely object to Conway’s appointment as chief of staff, two people familiar with the matter said – the two White House aides aren’t friendly.
    Some Mulvaney allies have meanwhile recently criticized White House Counsel Pat Cipollone, another potential replacement. They say the attorney is to blame for the administration’s impeachment strategy, and described Cipollone as having a bunker mentality that’s kept the White House on lock-down and discouraged allies from publicly fighting for the president.
    Not Perfect
    Mulvaney said Sunday he hasn’t offered his resignation to Trump over Thursday’s press briefing.
    “Did I have the perfect press conference, no,” Mulvaney said on “Fox News Sunday.” “I still think I’m doing a pretty good job as the chief of staff, and I think the president agrees.”
    One White House official concurred, saying that Trump was pleased with Mulvaney’s performance at the briefing and asked that the message be passed along to the chief of staff. And the president’s campaign seemed to offer Mulvaney a signal of support late last week, announcing the sale of t-shirts featuring a phrase Mulvaney used in the news conference to dismiss concern about Trump’s intermingling his political interests with U.S. foreign policy: “Get over it.”
    But Mulvaney has come under fire from some of the president’s loudest cheerleaders, including Fox News personality Sean Hannity, who called the acting chief of staff “dumb” during his Friday radio show and said his “interpretation of things” was “idiotic.” Fox Business Network host Lou Dobbs called Mulvaney’s press conference “thoroughly confusing” and said it “seemed to contradict what the president has said.”
    Both broadcasters frequently laud the president, who often returns the praise. But Hannity didn’t ask about the chief of staff in an interview with Trump he aired on Monday.
    With assistance from Justin Sink and Jordan Fabian.
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    Quote Originally Posted by roadreeler57 View Post








    LoL
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    Fun time with Finchy.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Acebb View Post
    'Nobody Pushed Me.' Ukrainian President Denies Trump Pressured Him to Investigate Biden's Son


    Taking questions in Ukrainian and English on Wednesday, Zelensky said that he doesn’t have the authority to pressure Ukrainian law enforcement, and did not attempt to do so.
    “We have an independent country and independent general security. I can’t push anyone,” Zelensky said.
    Uh, you were SAYING, A-Sap-Sucker?
    Ukrainian leader felt Trump pressure before taking office

    DESMOND BUTLER and MICHAEL BIESECKER,Associated Press 1 hour 50 minutes ago







    KYIV, Ukraine (AP) — More than two months before the phone call that launched the impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump, Ukraine's newly elected leader was already worried about pressure from the U.S. president to investigate his Democratic rival Joe Biden.
    Volodymyr Zelenskiy gathered a small group of advisers on May 7 in Kyiv for a meeting that was supposed to be about his nation's energy needs. Instead, the group spent most of the three-hour discussion talking about how to navigate the insistence from Trump and his personal lawyer, Rudy Giuliani, for a probe and how to avoid becoming entangled in the American elections, according to three people familiar with the details of the meeting.
    They spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity because of the diplomatic sensitivity of the issue, which has roiled U.S.-Ukrainian relations.
    The meeting came before Zelenskiy was inaugurated but about two weeks after Trump called to offer his congratulations on the night of the Ukrainian leader's April 21 election.
    The full details of what the two leaders discussed in that Easter Sunday phone call have never been publicly disclosed, and it is not clear whether Trump explicitly asked for an investigation of the Bidens.
    The three people's recollections differ on whether Zelenskiy specifically cited that first call with Trump as the source of his unease. But their accounts all show the Ukrainian president-elect was wary of Trump's push for an investigation into the former vice president and his son Hunter's business dealings.
    Either way, the newly elected leader of a country wedged between Russia and the U.S.-aligned NATO democracies knew early on that vital military support might depend on whether he was willing to choose a side in an American political tussle. A former comedian who won office on promises to clean up corruption, Zelenskiy's first major foreign policy test came not from his enemy Russia, but rather from the country's most important ally, the United States.
    The May 7 meeting included two of his top aides, Andriy Yermak and Andriy Bogdan, the people said. Also in the room was Andriy Kobolyev, head of the state-owned natural gas company Naftogaz, and Amos Hochstein, an American who sits on the Ukrainian company's supervisory board. Hochstein is a former diplomat who advised Biden on Ukraine matters during the Obama administration.
    Zelenskiy's office in Kyiv did not respond to messages on Wednesday seeking comment. The White House would not comment on whether Trump demanded an investigation in the April 21 call.
    The White House has offered only a bare-bones public readout on the April call, saying Trump urged Zelenskiy and the Ukrainian people to implement reforms, increase prosperity and "root out corruption." In the intervening months, Trump and his proxies have frequently used the word "corruption" to reference the monthslong efforts to get the Ukrainians to investigate Democrats.
    Trump has said he would release a transcript of the first call, but the White House had no comment Wednesday on when, or if, that might happen.
    After news broke that a White House whistleblower had filed a complaint about his July 25 call with Zelenskiy, Trump said the conversation was "perfect" and that he had asked his Ukrainian counterpart to do "whatever he can in terms of corruption because the corruption is massive."
    During the call, Trump asked Zelenskiy for "a favor," requesting an investigation into a conspiracy theory related to a Democratic computer server hacked during the 2016 election campaign. Trump also pushed Zelenskiy to investigate Biden and his son. Trump then advised Zelenskiy that Giuliani and Attorney General Bill Barr would be contacting him about the request, according to a summary of the called released by the White House.
    Within days, Giuliani flew to Madrid to meet privately with Yermak, Zelenskiy's aide who was in the May 7 meeting.
    Trump has denied that an investigation of Biden was a condition for releasing military aid as a quid pro quo. But on Tuesday, the senior U.S. diplomat in Ukraine at the time, Ambassador William Taylor, starkly contradicted the president, saying that Trump had demanded that everything Zelenskiy wanted, including the aid and a White House meeting, was conditional on a public vow that he would open an investigation.
    Taylor also detailed multiple previously undisclosed diplomatic interactions between Trump's envoys and senior Ukrainian officials in which the president's demand to investigate the Bidens in exchange for American aid was clear.
    The continued flow of high-tech U.S. weaponry is seen as essential to the survival of the Ukrainian government, which has been mired in a long-running civil war with Russian-aligned separatists in the east of the county. In 2014, masked Russian troops took control of Ukraine's Crimean Peninsula. Russia later annexed it, provoking Western sanctions against Moscow.
    In a joint Sept. 25 news conference with Trump at the United Nations in New York, Zelenskiy denied he felt pressured to investigate the Bidens.
    "I'm sorry, but I don't want to be involved, to democratic, open elections of U.S.A.," the Ukrainian leader said. "We had, I think, good phone call. It was normal. We spoke about many things, and I think, and you read it, that nobody push it. Push me."
    Trump then chimed in: "In other words, no pressure."
    Before Zelenskiy was elected, however, a public campaign to initiate investigations into the Bidens was already underway.
    For weeks, conservative media outlets in the U.S. had trumpeted unfounded accusations that Biden, the Obama administration's top envoy to the war-torn former Soviet republic, had sought the removal of the country's top prosecutor in order to stymie an investigation in Burisma, a Ukrainian energy company that later hired his son to serve on its board.
    Both Trump and Giuliani made public comments and tweets referencing the Biden accusations, with the president's lawyer suggesting in a Fox News interview on April 7 that the U.S. Justice Department should investigate the matter.
    One day before Zelenskiy's May 7 meeting with his advisers, the U.S. State Department recalled Ambassador Marie Yovanovitch, a career diplomat with a reputation for combating corruption. Yovanovitch had been the target of a sustained yearlong smear campaign by Giuliani and his associates.
    When Trump called Zelenskiy on July 25 to congratulate the Ukrainian president on "a great victory" after his Servant of the People party won control of Ukrainian parliament, Zelenskiy downplayed his discomfort.
    "The first time, you called me to congratulate me when I won my presidential election, and the second time you are now calling me when my party won the parliamentary election," Zelenskiy said, according to the rough transcript. "I think I should run more often so you can call me more often, and we can talk over the phone more often."

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    What's wrong, A Sap Sucker, cat got yer crotch?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dafinch View Post
    What do you EXPECT the guy being extorted to say when the shakedown artist is present, ya dumb bastard? GEEZ, you're dumb. Meanwhile, Dump is shopping for, yet again, a Chief of Staff, lol.
    Yes, every allegation is true and every counter to the allegations are false.

    You're so stupid it is frightening.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dafinch View Post
    What's wrong, A Sap Sucker, cat got yer crotch?
    You actually posted an article using anonymous sources (it is clear you didn't read it) as if that refutes the on the record comments by the Ukrainian President.

    "according to three people familiar with the details of the meeting."

    Are you retarded?

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  16. #16  
    Conservatives, Patriots & Huskies return to glory Willie99's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gas Man View Post
    Again, why do people give duuuuhfeces so much credit?

    This is where street squatters (A/K/A the democratic base) live


    "The best argument against democracy is a five-minute conversation with the average voter". "A rising tide raises all boats". "MAGA"
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  17. #17  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Acebb View Post
    You actually posted an article using anonymous sources (it is clear you didn't read it) as if that refutes the on the record comments by the Ukrainian President.

    "according to three people familiar with the details of the meeting."

    Are you retarded?

    No, but, YOU apparently are, because you're so stupid that you don't-or won't-see why the people in question would demand anonymity. How do you find your way at home at night, Bird Brain?
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