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Thread: Ever Wonder Why California is so Broke?

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  1. #51  
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    Quote Originally Posted by festeringZit View Post
    Bingo.
    There is no rule of law at the moment.

    Once the crooks have been kicked out America can march forward again as the Founding Fathers intended.

    But how is that going to happen?

    How Widespread is Voter Fraud? | 2012 Facts & Figures

    http://www.truethevote.org/news/how-...-facts-figures
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  2. #52  
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    Record-High 60% of Californians Say They Pay Too Much Tax


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    by Joel B. Pollak 13 Apr 2014 1765 post a comment
    Ahead of the April 15 tax deadline, a record-high 60% of Californians say that they pay "much more" or "somewhat more" in taxes than they should, according to a recent survey by the Public Policy Institute of California (PPIC) (and noted by John Seiler of Calwatchdog.org and Stephen Frank of CApoliticalnews.com).

    However, as PPIC Mark Baldassare notes at Fox&Hounds, Californians still believe that the answer is to tax wealthy earners or corporations more--not to reform and broaden the current tax system.
    The PPIC survey, which was conducted in March among 1,702 adults, notes:
    While about half of Californians view the state and local tax system as fair, a record-high 60 percent of adults say they pay much more (30%) or somewhat more (30%) than they feel they should in state and local taxes; 35 percent think they pay about the right amount and 3 percent say they pay less than they should. Opinions of likely voters are similar.
    However, as Baldassare notes, that view of the tax system remains tied to a view that the wealthy do not pay enough, and that the state should restore and extend funding for state services. That makes the prospects for fiscal reform rather dim: "If tax reform proponents ask voters to raise taxes or to make changes to the state and local tax system any time soon, they will need to be mindful of voters’ current views on these issues," he writes.
    Other findings in the survey include increasing concern about water, which is named as the state's second-most important issue after jobs and the economy; a record-high level of support for immigrants, with 65% saying that they are a benefit to the state; and near record-low levels of support for President Barack Obama, albeit still just above 50%.
    The state also remains staunchly liberal on a variety of social issues, from abortion to gun control.
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  3. #53  
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    The WSJ article I have linked below is from a couple years ago, but not much has changed.

    Absolutely agree with Kotkin.

    It's "a very scary political dynamic," he says. "One day somebody's going to put on the ballot, let's take every penny over $100,000 a year, and you'll get it through because there's no real restraint. What you've done by exempting people from paying taxes is that they feel no responsibility. That's certainly a big part of it.

    http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/...40531861056966
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  4. #54  
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    Quote Originally Posted by festeringZit View Post
    Record-High 60% of Californians Say They Pay Too Much Tax
    Tough shit.

    'Progressivism' ain't cheap.

    Californians got the government they deserve.
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  5. #55  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sheriff Joe View Post
    Tough shit.

    'Progressivism' ain't cheap.

    Californians got the government they deserve.
    That’s usually the way it works.
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  6. #56  
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    In case anyone forgot.

    Since taking office in 2009, President Barack Obama has formally proposed a total of 442 tax increases, according to an Americans for Tax Reform analysis of Obama administration budgets for fiscal years 2010 through 2015.

    The 442 total proposed tax increases does not include the 20 tax increases Obama signed into law as part of Obamacare.

    Next...



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  7. #57  
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    [ Toyota leaving the socialist liberal cesspool known as California. and taking 5,000 jobs with it. Welcome to the great state of Texas ]

    BREAKING: Sources say Toyota fleeing CA, taking 5,000 jobs to more business-friendly Texas

    By Michael Carney
    On April 27, 2014

    California’s inhospitable tax policies may have struck again, this time costing Los Angeles one of its largest employers. According to multiple sources close to the situation, Toyota will be relocating its US headquarters from the LA suburb of Torrance to Plano, Texas.
    The company has yet to notify its employees of the news, but is expected to do so Monday, followed by a public announcement. While it’s unlikely that Toyota, which is ranked 8th on Fortune’s Global 500, will directly cite taxes as the reason for its relocation, it should come as little surprise that the financial burden of operating in California – both on the corporation and its employees personally – played a major role.
    A number of early stage entrepreneurs, including Pando contributor Bryan Goldberg, have discussed publicly their decisions to start companies outside of California. Now, it appears that frustration has moved its way up the economic food chain.
    It wouldn’t be the first time. Nissan made a similar exodus in 2006, finding a more welcoming home for its US headquarters in Tennessee, where local and state governments rolled out the tax incentive red carpet. Honda too has shifted its headquarters from Carson, CA to Marysville, Ohio, but retains a dwindling LA operation. Persistent rumors, however, suggest that it may eventually shutter its California presence entirely.
    Toyota employed 4,900 workers as of 2011, when the last available data was released, placing it in the top 40 among area employers at the time. The company has also been exceptionally active in terms of supporting the surrounding communities, regularly sponsoring and hosting prominent events. For all these reasons, the loss of Toyota is one that will cut deep locally. It’s unclear whether the move will mean the elimination of all LA-based positions, but it’s clear that the move is more than a symbolic one and that the company will no longer be a tentpole corporation in the area.
    But despite the sting, this move should come as little surprise to anyone who’s been paying attention. California hasn’t had a balanced budget, yet alone an economic surplus, seemingly since the last dinosaurs went extinct. As a result, the state has continued to raise taxes, while at the same time failing to deliver quality services to its citizens.
    Sure we may have the weather and the beaches, but there’s a compelling argument to be made that there’s a higher quality of life (relative to the cost) available elsewhere. Valley boosters would argue the talent and the ecosystem make running a tech company elsewhere unthinkable. But Toyota’s near-5,000 employees will soon be testing whether the Texas grass really is greener.
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    Anyone want to render a guess as to how long it will take for California to bankrupt itself?
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  9. #59  
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    I moved out here some time ago to take a job. Wasn't excited about it, but for my line of work, it had to be done. Recently though, I've been looking aggressively in places like Texas and Florida for something else.

    Isn't it funny that the states with the highest tax rates always seem to be in the worst shape and provide the crappiest service? I don't feel any sympathy for the braindead idiots out here who keep voting the same dimocrap tools into office over and over and over and over again.

    Losing Toyota is huge. It's not like the whole entertainment sector is packing up and leaving (although a good number of those companies are starting to do just that)...but as you saw in the article, plenty of jobs will be leaving the state. And I'm sure the majority of morons who live out here will have no clue why.
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    This Insane Bill Could End The State Of California As We Know It

    Will this break the back of California's economy?



    JAMES V LACYAPRIL 25, 2014


    PAGES: 1 2

    California’s liberal Democrats in control of state government just can’t do enough to help boot-out corporations and high-wage earners from the state. Now they are pushing to change the state tax code to tax corporations not on their profits, but on their level of “high income disparity” between top executives and the average worker in the business.

    In 2012, liberal Democrats supported and passed an initiative that raised the state income tax to the highest levels in the nation and made it retroactive on millionaires.

    Coupled with an additional 1% “millionaires” tax imposed during Arnold Schwarzenegger’s reign as Governor, the top marginal income tax rate in California is now a whopping 13.3% of income, more than New York State’s and New York City’s top marginal income tax rates combined. When added to federal tax rates in the top marginal tier, California’s most successful wage earners paid a 52.9% income tax rate in Federal and state taxes last April 15. At least the top wage earners who actually still live in California paid 52.9%.

    In the last year, real estate transactions in lovely Incline Village, a not too far away play-land for Silicon Valley executives just across the Nevada border, have sky-rocketed. Sales of estates are hitting record levels, and Incline Village has advanced to one of Coldwell Banker’s top 20 real estate markets in the nation. And the reason isn’t just for the skiing or great views of Lake Tahoe. The real estate boom in northern Nevada has everything to do with the fact that Nevada doesn’t have an income tax.

    California doesn’t just have the highest state income tax in the nation. It leads the rest of the country in almost every category of taxation: the highest state sales tax, the highest taxes on gasoline at the pump, and the highest corporate tax west of the Mississippi. And the taxes aren’t doing much for the people of the state, rich or poor. For the first time in history, the Census Bureau reports that California is also the poorest state in the nation, with 23.8% of the population living in poverty, in large part because of California’s high cost of living (which is not helped by all the sky-high consumption taxes the Democrats have enacted and the poor must pay to survive.)

    CEO Magazine has proclaimed that California is the worst state to do business in, because of its pervasive regulations, for each of the last nine years. But California’s liberal Democrats who run things in Sacramento don’t seem content with having already enacted policies that encourage top wage earners to leave the state for one of the many lower tax states in the nation. Now they are intent on enacting further disincentives to business investment in the state, and to actually encourage wholesale export of business corporations and the jobs they create, by radically changing the way the state taxes businesses in order to address “high wage disparity,” otherwise known as “income inequality.”

    The new legislation, known as “Senate Bill 1372,” would raise state corporation taxes not on profits. If passed, California’s already high current corporate tax of just less than 9% would shift to a new formula in 2015 based on the corporation’s median compensation of employees as compared to the highest employee, rather than to simply tax profits.

    According to the Sacramento Business Journal, if the corporation’s top paid executive made 100 times the median worker salary in the company, the company’s tax rate would rise 9%. Companies paying the top earner 400 times the average salary would pay a 13 percent tax rate. But if the chief executive made just 25 times more than the average wage earner, the corporate tax would be just 7%.

    California’s newly proposed corporate tax system turns the whole purpose of taxation – which is to fund government services – upside down. Instead, the purpose of the corporate tax would not be to fund government; rather, it would be to force income distribution outcomes dictated by the government and not market forces. The result? Punishing ailing California companies just coming out of the recession, like San Francisco-based Wells Fargo. California based companies already stressing over a persistently poor business and regulatory climate would not be able to afford the best talent to manage their businesses. Combined with high levels of taxation, Senate Bill 1372 is simply an open invitation to the nation’s most successful corporations to simply pick-up stakes and take their high wage earners (as well as all their jobs) out of state. It is more-or-less a “last straw.” At a time and in a state where unemployment remains 20% to 25% higher than in the rest of the country, where the poor are getting poorer, and where the top 5% of wage wage-earners pay 62% of all state income tax, this new “high wage disparity” threatens California’s economic future; and the bill is sheer insanity.

    This post originally appeared on California Political Review and is re-posted with permission.

    James V. Lacy’s first book, Taxifornia, is available at Amazon.com.

    Read more at http://www.westernjournalism.com/cal...jip8bFAVZ2K.99
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  11. #61  
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    Joe this may shock you and as you know I am a capitalist through and through. I think most corporate top executives are way overpaid. Not to say I agree with this particular piece of legislation but the more I think about it what are the alternatives. Most corporations evade taxation at every turn and the bigger ones can fight audits to exhaustion. Same goes for those top wage earners, they have loop holes galore. All the more reason for a flat tax and I wonder why that did not come up as an alternative. Just redo the whole tax system. Also some things that are write offs at the federal level should not necessarily be treated the same by a given state. California dug their own whole but the whole concept of not funding retirement plans in full at the end of every fiscal year has always eluded me, on both a corporate level and on the government level especially with cities, counties, and states. They not only spend money they don't have, they credit retirement funds with money they don't have. I don't get it. All this type of legislation does it attempt to correct a hopeless situation created by liberal politicians. California does not get it and they never will.
    "Always drink upstream from the herd"
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    More from the Land of Fruit and Nuts.

    One of the most liberal Representatives in Congress wants California to raise its minimum wage to $26 an hour.
    Appearing on Crossfire on Friday, co-host Newt Gingrich asked Rep. Barbara Lee (D-CA) whether it was a good idea for the mayor of Seattle to propose a minimum wage of $15 an hour. Lee said, "good for him."

    "In California, more than likely from what I remembered, a living wage where people could live and take care of their families and move toward achieving the American dream was about $25, $26 an hour," Lee said.

    When pressed further, Lee said she would "absolutely" support it for California and claimed it would not cause more unemployment.

    Rep. Andy Harris (R-MD) said he would also support California raising its minimum wage that high so companies would leave California and bring jobs to other states. Harris said "maybe even Maryland can get more jobs because they will leave California.

    They just did. Toyota left for Texas."
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  13. #63  
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    More from the failed state that is California:

    The California Legislature is looking at a voluntary program that would tax motorists for every mile they drive.
    KCAL9’s Bobby Kaple reports that Sen. Mark DeSaulnier, D-Concord, introduced a bill to test out the vehicle miles traveled (VMT) tax because the state’s gas tax was no longer bringing in the revenue it used to due to people driving more fuel efficient vehicles.

    http://losangeles.cbslocal.com/2014/...le-they-drive/
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    http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/britis...uver-1.2659431


    Sony Pictures Imageworks moving headquarters to Vancouver


    One of Hollywood's biggest visual effects studios Sony Pictures Imageworks is moving its headquarters from California to Vancouver, the company has confirmed.

    The Oscar-winning animation division of Sony recently produced some of the effects on the Tom Cruise sci-fi thriller Edge of Tomorrow and The Amazing Spider Man 2.
    The company says 700 employees will be moving into a new 74,000-square-foot studio at the Pacific Centre, making it the city's largest visual effects and digital character animation studio by floor space.

    “It offers an attractive lifestyle for artists in a robust business climate. Expanding our headquarters in Vancouver will allow us to deliver visual effects of the highest calibre and value to our clients.” “Vancouver has developed into a world-class centre for visual effects and animation production,” said Randy Lake, executive vice president and general manager at Sony Pictures Digital Productions, in a statement issued on Friday morning.

    - - - -

    Translation: Toyota has shown us the way. To hell with this stupid state, their braindead socialist leaders and their idiotic tax laws.
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  15. #65  
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    its not like Canada has low taxes, so there probably is another reason here
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    Quote Originally Posted by SmallDaddy View Post
    its not like Canada has low taxes, so there probably is another reason here
    Your bambino is a train wreck.
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    [ 53% of voters would kick California out of the union, with it's flaming liberals and fruity freaks. ]

    Fox News Poll: Voters reveal which state they want kicked out of the union



    By Dana Blanton
    Published October 02, 2014FoxNews.com


    Facebook739 Twitter273 livefyre1667 Email Print

    Jan. 6, 2006: The U.S. Capitol Building is seen from a U.S. military helicopter in Washington. (Reuters)


    There’s lots of talk about it. Last month, Scotland voted against it. In 2013, some residents in California, Colorado and Maryland signed petitions to do it. And Texas has toyed with the idea off and on for years. What is “it”?
    Secession!
    But it’s a lot more talk than anything else, according to a Fox News national poll that asked voters if they would support their state splitting off from the United States. Just nine percent said they would.
    CLICK HERE TO READ THE POLL RESULTS
    The poll also gave people another option: What if you could boot other states out of the union?
    Nearly twice as many -- 17 percent -- liked that idea.
    Which state would be the first voted out? California. Of the voters willing to ditch a state or two, 53 percent pick the Golden State.
    Next out the door is New York (25 percent), followed by Texas (20 percent) and Florida (11 percent). Respondents were allowed to name multiple states they wanted out of the union.
    Democratic pollster Chris Anderson says voters who want to kick out a state appear to have presidential politics in mind.
    “The top four states targeted for expulsion,” he observed, “are also the four most electorally rich states in the country.” Anderson conducts the Fox News poll with Republican pollster Daron Shaw, who for his part approvingly noted the first two states on the chopping block are solid blue.
    One reason more Democratic states end up on the chopping block is Republicans (21 percent) are more likely than Democrats (13 percent) to want to vote a state out of the union.
    In addition, Republicans (12 percent) and independents (13 percent) are three times as likely as Democrats (4 percent) to want their state to secede. Nearly one in four voters who are part of the Tea Party movement would vote for their state to split off (23 percent).
    The Fox News poll is based on landline and cell phone interviews with 1,049 randomly chosen registered voters nationwide and was conducted under the joint direction of Anderson Robbins Research (D) and Shaw & Company Research (R) from September 28-30, 2014. The full poll has a margin of sampling error of plus or minus three percentage points.
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    California city passes nation’s first soda tax


    By Leonard Greene

    November 5, 2014 | 8:18pm

    Modal Trigger


    Photo: EPA

    Now he’s California’s nanny.
    In return for the $20 million Mike Bloomberg shelled out for causes and candidates in Tuesday’s election, the former mayor finally got to claim victory on one of his premier social change initiatives that flopped in New York — a soda tax.
    With the help of Bloomberg dollars, voters in Berkeley passed a first-in-the-nation, penny-an-ounce tax on sugar-sweetened beverages, including sodas, energy drinks and pre-sweetened teas, a measure aimed at curbing obesity.
    Bloomberg wisely avoided a similar ballot initiative in San Francisco, where voters defeated a measure to add a 2-cent sweet-beverage tax.
    Bloomberg also supported a measure in Washington state that enacted tougher background checks on gun purchases.
    And the ex-mayor spread the wealth among a dozen winning candidates across the country, on both sides of the political aisle, who share his centrist values.
    “No other individual spent as much money in support of both Republican and Democratic candidates, and no one had as much success at the state level in backing successful candidates from both parties,” boasted Bloomberg aide Howard Wolfson.
    Among the gubernatorial candidates helped by Bloomberg’s big bucks were Charlie Baker, a Republican in Massachusetts, John Hickenlooper, a Democrat in Colorado, Dan Malloy, a Democrat in Connecticut, Gina Raimondo, a Democrat in Rhode Island and Rick Snyder, a Republican in Michigan.
    In the Senate, Bloomberg backed winners Ed Markey, a Democrat, in Massachusetts and Lindsay Graham, a Republican, in South Carolina.
    “Mike Bloomberg is putting his money where his mouth is,” said Doug Muzzio, a political consultant who teaches at Baruch College. “If you look at the scorecard, they did well and they did it in a diverse, non-partisan way.”
    Muzzio said Bloomberg might be more effective on the sidelines than he was when he was in office.
    “The bottom line is he can have all the great ideas in the world, but it won’t mean a damn thing unless he puts his money behind it. The guy remains an active political player. The reality is that it’s a money game, and bemoaning the impact of money doesn’t get you very far.”
    Bloomberg’s money didn’t win every race. There were also a few losers, such as State Sen Mark Grisanti, a Buffalo lawmaker, who backed gay marriage.
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    More news on this failed state:

    SAN JOSE, Calif.Living in "The Jungle" means learning to live in fear. Especially after dark, when some people get violent. The 68-acre homeless camp in South San Jose is considered the largest in the United States. It's a lawless place.
    "When something goes wrong, you have to have some kind of backup," says Troy Feid, pulling out a machete that he carries up his sleeve at night. "Just having it says 'Don't mess with me.' "



    Feid, an unemployed union carpenter, lives in a fortress of netting and plastic tarp with a cat named Baby. He's one of the 278 people who've claimed a spot in the thicket of cottonwood trees along Coyote Creek. He first moved here four years ago when he ran out of work.
    ...

    "You need to work five minimum-wage jobs to afford to live here," said Jennifer Loving, executive director of Destination: Home, the public-private partnership to end homelessness in Santa Clara County. "No one can do that. That right there creates a huge income disparity."
    This year, San Jose and the surrounding county surpassed Los Angeles as having the country's highest rate of homeless people living on the streets, according to the annual homelessness assessment report from the U.S. Housing and Urban Development Department. Three-quarters of the area's 7,567 homeless residents are from Santa Clara County. Most of them live in one of San Jose's 247 tent cities, just miles from the sprawling headquarters of Google and Apple.

    http://www.nationaljournal.com/next-...-camp-20141125
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    CALIFORNIA TEACHERS' PENSION STILL INSOLVENT

    by CHRISS W. STREET
    29 Oct 2014 37POST A COMMENT


    California public employees now enjoy the highest benefits of any state in the nation. To pretend to fund this largess, California State Teachers’ Retirement System (CalSTRS) is an “outlier” among public pension plans in using creative accounting to blur its grossly underfunded status. This has allowed its school district clients and unionized employees to short-check their annual payment for the nation’s most lucrative teachers' pension benefits. But pressure from Moody’s credit rating agency is causing CalSTRS clients and unionized teachers to make big increases in pension and benefit funding.

    The latest “hokey-pokey” drama is the California State Teachers’ Retirement System deciding if 7% or 7.5% is a good estimate of future investment performance. Private pension plans that are subject to federal oversight buy a mix of stocks and bonds, with a conservative expectation of earning about 5% annual returns. But public pension plans that are not subject to federal law use accounting tricks and a speculatively high expected investment return so they can minimize the amount state and local government and union employees must contribute each year to keep the pensions from running out of money.

    The credit rating service, Moody’s, has never accepted CalSTRS or any of California’s public pension and healthcare liability calculations. They calculate pension underfunding by using a 5% earning expectation. The lower Moody’s rate would mean that CalSTRS current underfunding would skyrocket to $300 billion.


    Moody’s has advised its institutional clients that invest in municipal bonds on September 25, 2014, that despite double-digit investment returns over the last decade, “between 2004 and 2012, unfunded liabilities for these [public pension] systems as calculated by Moody’s tripled to just under $2 trillion.” According to Moody’s, government used accounting tricks to allow “deferral of contributions for budgetary reasons, but the back-loading of costs through asset smoothing and 30 year amortization.”


    Before 1987, public pension plans in California invested only in bonds. The pensions were adequately funded because everyone knew that the bonds earned interest and eventually would mature. The life-time pension benefit required both the union employees and the government entity to fund about 50% of the lifetime pensions. The other 50% was expected to be paid from bond interest.


    But after 1987, public pensions were allowed to invest in stocks. Since stock returns were difficult to predict, the public pension plans would hire “experts” to estimate future earnings. But the pension plans were motivated to hire experts who would predict highly inflated returns so government and union employees could minimize contributions.


    The state’s “experts” currently predict all the state benefit plans are wildly underfunded, despite incredibly dubious assumptions that 1) investments will always yield 7.5% per year without a loss, 2) no employees will get big raises in their last years of employment, 3) all employees will work for 30 years before retiring; and 4) all employees who retire early will die early.

    Based on these unrealistic assumptions:


    CalSTRS Pension - $80.4 billion underfunded
    State Retiree Health Care - $63.8 billion underfunded
    State Employees’ Pension - $48.6 billion underfunded
    UC Healthcare Pension - $25.0 billion underfunded


    This underfunding was supposed to change in 2012 with the Proposition 30 tax increase. It provided $3 billion a year to schools for funding CalSTRS “catch-up” funding payments. Although this was a start, union teachers were not required to make sufficient payroll contributions to keep the fund solvent.


    But with Moody’s threatening to downgrade the state’s debt over pension shortfalls, the California Legislature passed a law this summer to increase CalSTRS funding by $5 billion. The school districts’ contribution rate will ratchet up from 8.25% of employees’ pay to 19.1% by July 2020, teachers’ contribution will rise from 8% to 10.25% of pay, and the state’ contribution for two CalSTRS funds will increase from 5.5% to 8.8%.


    Although this is a good start toward becoming solvent, cutting CalSTRS's 7.5% expected rate of return on investments to 7% will result over thirty years of compounding with 25% less return. CalSTRS surveyed eight consultants and five asset managers they hand-picked to estimate future compound earnings. But the experts agreed that “consensus assumptions likely lead to expected compound long-term returns of 7 percent or less for typical institutional portfolio over a 10-year period,according to its spokesman.


    To adequately fund CalSTRS pension promises with a 5% investment return expectation advocated by Moody’s would require the unionized teachers’ contribution to more than double to 25% of their pay. CalSTRS will remain substantially insolvent because it would be political suicide for members of the legislature to demand that unionized teachers actually pay for the pension and healthcare benefits they receive.

    http://www.breitbart.com/Breitbart-California/2014/10/29/Cal-Teachers-Pension-Still-Insolvent
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  21. #71  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sheriff Joe View Post
    CalSTRS will remain substantially insolvent because it would be political suicide for members of the legislature to demand that unionized teachers actually pay for the pension and healthcare benefits they receive.

    This amazes people who weren't aware of this. And you're reading that correctly...California teachers don't pay a damn penny of their own money for their pension or health care. No doctor co-pays, no dental fees for anyone in their family...basically no medical bills. Yet they still continue to bitch and demand more in every negotiation cycle. It's one thing for private industry to offer that kind of insanely generous benefit package...but fuck, when you're living large off the backs of working taxayers, that's my definition of greedy.

    A year or so ago, there was a firefighter near here in Barstow who retired and it made the news. Why? Well, Barstow is a small city off the freeway on the way from LA to Vegas. The guy had something like 3,000 vacation hours and another 3,000 sick day hours banked, because those benefits never expire under the current CBA. By state law, that all gets paid out upon retirement or termination. When he retired, that bill alone came out to something like $500k that the state had to fork over...and that doesn't even include the pension he's going to receive. There are many, many more firemen, cops, and other state employees in a similar situation. What are the chances that California will be able to actually honor and pay out all these benefits? Roughly the same as the 130-lb placekick holder getting any non-paid pussy in his life.

    California has been controlled and run by dimocraps for decades. Even when the Governator was here, he turned into a candy-assed RINO. If you want to see the Stuttering Clusterfuck's wet dream for what America should become, just take a long look at CA.
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  22. #72  
    RX Local akphidelt's Avatar
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    Because they have to give so much money back to the Govt in order to pay for the degenerate conservative states.
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  23. #73  
    RX Deplorable
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    California = akphidelt-o-nomics

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  24. #74  
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    Quote Originally Posted by akphidelt View Post
    Because they have to give so much money back to the Govt in order to pay for the degenerate conservative states.
    examples please
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  25. #75  
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